Tuesday, 21 January 2014

The Patron Saint of Paedophiles.

The Patron Saint of Paedophiles.

Girl chat for 'Girl Lovers'

You can see an image of Alice Liddell on the right hand side

Alice Day is Paedophile pride day -April 25th


Charles Dodgson did not love 'Children' He loved lots of little girls, especially Alice Liddell. He was obsessed with her. He spent every moment that he could with her. Up until suddenly in June 1863, their friendship ended after an unexplained rift with Alice's Mother. He also took many images of nude girls (Not boys) Some which were posed seductively, unlike the images of other Victorian photographers like Julia Cameron, who used nude children. But they were not seductively posed as Dodgson's photographs. Around this same time, he suddenly gave up his love of photography after his request to photograph nude children without the presence their parents. The full frontal naked photograph of Alice's sister Lorina was recently discovered in a French museum. The photograph states that it is 'Lorina Liddell by Charles Dodgson' It has been tested and concluded that it is not a fake and a forensic test compared Dodgsons original images of Lorina to that of the nude teenager. They concluded that the facial features are indeed the same girl and that Lorina would of been the same age as the nude girl. 
 He wrote to Gertrude Thomson, an artist who was sketching girlish fairies and nymphs, "I confess I do not admire naked boys in pictures. They always seem... to need clothes, whereas one hardly sees why the lovely forms of girls should ever be covered up."

This image of a photo possibly of Lorina Liddell by Dodgson (Which I have censored) I found on a 'Girl lovers' Chatroom

And here is a close-up of her face



Charles lutwidge Dodgson aka Lewis Carroll with the Liddell family
 "I am fond of children (except boys)," and photographed many pretty little girls -- some languidly stretched out on a bed, some nude". Charles Dodgson.
*(I was unable to find any photographs of 'nude boys')

 Evelyn Hatch- by Charles Dodgson.

Charles Dodgson and some of the little girls that he photographed.








Dodgson had been groomed for the ordained ministry in the Anglican Church from a very early age and was expected, as a condition of his residency at Christ Church, to take holy orders within four years of obtaining his master's degree. However, he evidently became reluctant to do this. He delayed the process for some time but eventually took deacon's orders 22 December 22, 1861. But when the time came a year later to progress to priestly orders, Dodgson appealed to the dean for permission not to proceed. This was against college rules, and initially Dean Liddell told him he would have to consult the college ruling body, which would almost undoubtedly have resulted in his being expelled. However, for unknown reasons, Dean Liddell changed his mind overnight and permitted Dodgson to remain at the college, in defiance of the rules. Uniquely amongst Senior Students of his time Dodgson never became a priest.

There is currently no conclusive evidence about why Dodgson rejected the priesthood. Some have suggested his stammer made him reluctant to take the step, because he was afraid of having to preach. Wilson quotes letters by Dodgson describing difficulty in reading lessons and prayers rather than preaching in his own words. But Dodgson did indeed preach in later life, even though not in priest's orders, so it seems unlikely his impediment was a major factor affecting his choice. Wilson also points out that the then Bishop of Oxford, Samuel Wilberforce, who ordained Dodgson, had strong views against members of the clergy going to the theatre, one of Dodgson's great interests. Others have suggested that he was having serious doubts about the Anglican church. It is known that he was interested in minority forms of Christianity (he was an admirer of FD Maurice) and "alternative" religions (theosophy). Dodgson became deeply troubled by an unexplained sense of sin and guilt at this time (the early 1860s), and frequently expressed the view in his diaries that he was a "vile and worthless" sinner, unworthy of the priesthood, and this sense of sin and unworthiness may well have had an impact on his decision to abandon the
priesthood.

In 1945, Florence Becker Lennon advanced the case that Dodgson had had an unhealthy attraction to Alice with Victoria Through the Looking Glass, the first modern critical biography of him. “People have wondered what he did with his love life,” Lennon wrote. “Now it can be told. He loved little girls, but, like Peter Pan, he had no intention of marrying them.” But Alice, she wrote, “was the first and most favoured of his girl friends,” and she speculated about the idea that Dodgson precipitated the rift with the Liddells by proposing “honourable marriage to [Alice] directly or through her parents” in 1863. Alice was 11 then—too young, even by Victorian mores.
Lennon’s basis for the assertion may have seemed sound: Ina was one of her sources. (Alice did not talk to Lennon because, her sister said, she was ill.) But in a letter to Alice, Ina wrote, “I tremble at what I said” to Lennon about the Liddell family’s supposed rift with Dodgson. “I said his manner became too affectionate to you as you grew older and that mother spoke to him about it, and that offended him, so he ceased coming to visit us again.” Ina had also told Lennon that she, Ina, was 10 at the time—but she was 14, or old enough to entertain formal suitors.


Full frontal nude photo of Lorina Liddell found
Lewis Carroll's shifting reputation.






The secret symbols used by paedophiles to identify each other

The secret world of Lewis Carroll-BBC documentary